Tom- and- Jerry

Amazon: Tom & Jerry cartoons are racist!

Are classic Tom & Jerry cartoons racist?

That’s the opinion of the scolds at Amazon.com, who’ve slapped an official “racial prejudice” warning on their streaming service, according to several news reports today.

Yesterday’s collegiate political correctness becomes today’s day-to-day reality, with seemingly no way to even slow down the insanity. At Amazon in particular, left-wing extremism appears to be official corporate policy.

From the Daily Mail: Read all »

Samsung ad

Samsung’s brilliant marketing on the fly

You really didn’t expect Apple’s competitors to remain silent in the face of the company’s newest fiascoes, did you?

With the above ad spoofing its unintended bendability (see above), Samsung has JUMPED on widely-publicized iPhone glitches, but fresh problems for Apple are emerging faster than the ability to lampoon them.

See below and try to keep from laughing (or crying if you’ve already purchased one) where it says they “MIGHT replace” the warped units: Read all »

Boston sunset

Everything that’s wrong with social media, in one story

Yes, the sunset was beautiful last night, but did you actually watch it, or use it to get social media attention?

This Boston.com post caught our attention for underscoring everything that’s wrong with social media today: it’s become a substitute for actually living. Read all »

old-microphone

EXCLUSIVE: Key analyst says talk radio’s biggest companies close to pulling the plug

It was a move that sent shudders through an already-nervous radio industry: Pittsburgh’s WPGB-FM suddenly dumped its talk format, switching to country music. The early August change meant America’s biggest hosts would have to relocate to a small, 7000-watt AM station.

Because it conflicted directly with the expected trend of moving talk AWAY from AM in favor of FM, many took it as a sign industry giant Clear Channel had made a U-turn. With digital streaming services and other emerging technologies stealing music fans from radio by the millions, talk was seen as the one format that could keep traditional broadcasting alive.

Local media speculated the real problem was excess clutter which keeps the average hour clogged up with extremely long commercial sets, news and weather breaks, plus recorded mini-features. Whatever the case, the medium that has done so much to change the national political landscape and inspired others around the world to do the same suddenly seemed more endangered. Read all »

ISIS twitter hoax US Army

Who is behind this sinister ISIS – US Army hoax?

Is a disturbing, yet fraudulent image making the rounds across the Internet the work of ISIS or like-minded terror groups?

As we learn more about their increasing sophistication, it becomes a bit easier to spot these social media disinformation campaigns. Rather than relying entirely on the shock value of public executions, we’re seeing subtle yet powerful schemes emerge from their ranks.

In the latest example, ISIS terrorists have been re-branded as American soldiers committing massacres while wearing Muslim garb. It’s a way of deflecting away blame for their atrocities. In America, it has fooled many on Twitter and elsewhere, so it could be considered a success so far. It has spread rapidly today. Read all »

Maroney McKayla 1

Nude celeb scandal: why are we asking the wrong questions?

Watching the media feeding frenzy over naked celeb pictures hacked from Apple’s cloud servers has been a strange experience. Why are so few asking the right questions?

Rather than fretting over the security breach, shouldn’t we instead wonder why so many have taken nude photos of themselves?

It’s particularly important with the revelation that Olympian McKayla Maroney was among those affected and that her images were taken when she was just 16. That has hackers wondering if they will face child porn charges (not clear at this time). Read all »

Brook Kelly 3

WWIII apparently trumped by celeb nude photo scandal

Since we’re nothing if not easily distracted (World War III can apparently wait), here’s a question: just how much outrage should we feel over this celeb nude photo scandal making headlines this morning?

Answer: it depends on the actress. While some have cultivated a wholesome image (Jennifer Lawrence, perhaps), only to have that violated by hackers, others have built careers on semi-nude publicity teases or even full-frontal film scenes. Read all »

James Foley

Did you view that horrible beheading video?

Though YouTube, Twitter and other sites have worked overtime to eliminate every trace of it, the horrible clip of James Foley’s beheading at the hands of Islamists has managed to be viewed millions of times today. That includes still images shared on social media sites, which have caused some to find their accounts terminated.

Were you among them? How did you feel?

You might not know that in the UK, just watching it is considered a crime under anti-terror statutes, subject to prosecution.

Zero Hedge finds this outrageous. Read all »

Blodget Henry 1

Major website cuts off Ferguson debate

(Update: readers tell us some newspaper and cable networks are also banning Ferguson discussions – please send any information you have via our contact page above so we may investigate further- thanks!)

While many Americans are calling for more dialogue on race relations in the wake of civil unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, one major website has abruptly cut if off entirely. The result looks a lot like Chinese-style self-censorship.

Business Insider readers had been puzzled for days by the unexplained shut-off of reader comments on all stories related to Ferguson. The site, founded by notorious dot.com-era securities analyst Henry Blodget, hadn’t explained the new policy. But one regular poster insisted on answers and finally got one from Founding Editor Jim Edwards. Read all »

Kittens & Puppies

Change.fraud

Thanks to a flaw at Change.org, you could be supporting causes you’ve never heard of.

That’s the warning from Linux operating system creator Linus Torvalds, who recently found himself on record as backing a petition at the site and was then deluged with spam email as a result. Apparently, there’s no email verification system, so virtually any name can be entered.

What about the potential liability if a person suffers consequences (career, political, or otherwise) as the result of improperly appearing on one? If someone were to create a “it should be legal to kick puppies and kittens” drive and place your name right at the top, would you sue? Read all »